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+ Athletic Trainers Job Description
One of the key players on any sports team never takes the field -- the athletic trainer. This member of the team keeps players in top shape. The most important part of the job is helping athletes prevent and recover from sports injuries. Working closely with team doctors, trainers wrap injuries and supervise physical therapy. Athletic trainers study practice sessions, and provide individualized exercise routines for athletes to improve their performance > view more

+ Chiropractors Job Description
Many people with aches, pains and other health complaints depend on chiropractors to help them cope. Also called Doctors of Chiropractic, or chiropractic physicians, they diagnose and treat patients whose health problems are associated with the body’s muscular, nervous, and skeletal systems, especially the spine. Chiropractors do not prescribe drugs or perform surgery, but they are thoroughly trained through two to four years of pre-professional college education, with a bachelor’s degree recommended > view more

+ Coaches and Scouts Job Description
With more leisure time than ever, the fitness craze has created better opportunities for sports instructors and coaches. The main difference between the two occupations is that instructors demonstrate general skills and rules of a particular sport to an individual or group, while coaches work to prepare an individual or team for competition and continue to give instruction during the competition > view more

+ Funeral Directors Job Description
Funeral Directors provide an important service for our society. Also called morticians and undertakers, they handle both the practical details of death, and the emotional needs of a family. They help make a difficult time easier, from arranging for the removal of remains from a home or hospital, to helping a family decide what kind of service to have, writing obituary notices, working with clergy, notifying government agencies, and arranging burial or cremation > view more

+ Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Job Description
For a Licensed Practical Nurse, or L-P-N, helping people is the top priority. Overall, L-P-Ns provide physical and emotional care for the sick, injured and handicapped. Specific duties range from taking a patient’s blood pressure… to starting intravenous fluids… to assisting emergency room staff during operations. Because a patient’s well-being depends greatly on quality care from L-P-Ns, responsibility and emotional strength are pre-requisites for the job > view more

+ Massage Therapists Job Description
It can be the ultimate luxurious treat…or an essential element of recovery from an injury…either way, massage therapy is a legitimate part of the health care profession. With the current movement toward natural health, wellness and prevention, there is renewed interest in massage therapy, which has its roots in ancient times. Massage Therapists can work for themselves, physical therapy and rehabilitation practices, a health club, spa,—even for a sports team or dance troupe > view more

+ Medical and Health Services Managers
Medical and health services managers are managers first and foremost. But because they are employed by hospitals, nursing homes, and government agencies concerned with health care, they face special challenges. The structure and financing of the health care industry is changing rapidly. So whether these managers oversee nursing, surgery, physical therapy, or some other hospital department, they are under constant pressure to cut costs while improving services > view more

+ Medical Assistants Job Description
Medical assistants are essential in keeping medical establishments organized and running smoothly. They must be organized individuals who can do several tasks at once and handle a large amount of detailed, important paperwork. If you are interested in this profession, you must work well with your hands, since duties can include the disposal of contaminated supplies or the sterilization of medical instruments > view more

+ Mental Health Counselors Job Description
Mental Health Counselors help to make life better for people with mental or emotional problems. They start by listening, to find out what’s wrong. They’re trained to help people talk about a wide range of issues, from depression, to substance abuse and family tensions. In addition to advising their clients, Mental Health Counselors work closely with other specialists in their field. For example, a patient might need to see a psychiatrist, who can prescribe medication > view more

+ Optometrists Job Description
Optometrists help people see better. They examine eyes to diagnose vision problems and eye diseases, and prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses. Optometrists are not physicians, but they do have extensive training. All states and the District of Columbia license optometrists, who are required to have a doctor of optometry degree from an accredited optometry school—which usually means a four year program after three years of undergraduate work > view more

+ Pharmacists Job Description
When a prescription is written for a drug or treatment, the next step for the patient is usually a visit to the pharmacist. And while for most people, that often means going to the local drug store, hospitals and community clinics have pharmacies as well. Typically, pharmacists spend most of the day standing at a counter, dispensing medication. They may also compound the medication, though this is now a much smaller part of a pharmacist’s practice > view more

+ Rehabilitation Counselors Job Description
Life presents challenges for all of us. But for some, those challenges are made even more difficult by disability. Helping people overcome disabilities is the job of Rehabilitation Counselors. They provide practical help and emotional support for clients who are struggling with the effects of illness, disease, birth defects, accidents, or the stress of daily life, and guide them back to productive lives > view more

+ Surgeons Job Description
Repairing injuries… preventing disease… even transplanting organs: surgeons are literally on the “cutting edge” of medicine. Unless it’s an emergency situation, the surgeon meets with the patient and listens to the problem. The doctor does an examination and considers medical history, lab work and other possible treatments before deciding on the need for surgery. Possessing that famous "good bedside manner" can help in explaining the diagnosis, the risks of the operation, and the patient's responsibilities before and after the procedure > view more