clerk videos

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+ Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Job Description
Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks have different assignments, but they all have the same job -— to help keep track of the money a business makes and spends. Bookkeeping clerks help by preparing balance sheets and other documents that summarize an organization’s financial position. Accounting clerks enter sales and purchasing transaction data. And auditing clerks verify that the figures are accurate and that the calculations are correct > view more

+ Brokerage Clerks Job Description
Wading through the frenzy of the trading floor… or surrounded by computers humming miles away from Wall Street… brokerage clerks track the progress of every player in the game of high finance. Their wide-ranging responsibilities in this growing field all involve computing and recording data on securities transactions. The most common type of brokerage clerk is called the Broker's assistant or sales assistant > view more

+ Cashiers Job Description
Cashiers account for the sale of a store’s merchandise - an important responsibility in helping businesses run smoothly and efficiently. To be considered for this kind of job, a store manager must believe an applicant to be trustworthy, since cashiers are given tremendous faith in safeguarding a business’s money. Duties include weighing produce and bulk food, receiving money, totaling bills and returning any change, and filling out charge forms and giving receipts > view more

+ Cost Estimators Job Description
In large and small businesses alike, clerks are the backbone of the back office. They are responsible for processing and maintaining large streams of financial information for customers and other workers. Billing clerks review sales data for products sold or services rendered, and prepare itemized bills to send to customers for payment. Cost clerks create production or sales cost reports for departments and prepare reports showing total cost and selling prices > view more

+ Counter and Rental Clerks
Counter and rental clerks facilitate transactions—whether the transaction is a car rental, a video tape rental, or accepting shoes to be repaired or clothes to be dry cleaned. Specific duties vary, but most counter and rental clerks are responsible for answering questions about the product or service being offered, its cost, and rental agreement details. Some may receive incentive pay for selling add-ons, options, or special memberships > view more

+ Court Clerks Job Description
Before a judge can bang the gavel to call a court to order…a court clerk organizes the whole procedure. It is up to the clerk to prepare a calendar of cases to be called in court, and to contact every person who will be needed to try the case. All the documents submitted for the case have to be pulled together and distributed. And the all-important procedures must be explained to those who will participate > view more

+ Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks Job Description
Companies know that extending credit is risky business. Credit authorizers, checkers and clerks work to reduce the risk. Credit clerks assemble the documents and process the transactions for people applying for loans or credit. Checkers verify what people put down on application forms. By phone or computer, checkers contact banks, credit bureaus and other sources for facts about an applicant's earnings, spending and bill-paying > view more

+ Finance Job Description
Financial Services professionals are people who do for business, what most of us have to do for ourselves: keep track of money. Just as individuals have to plan for expenses, and figure out how to live on the revenue coming in, so do corporations and government. Providing financial services requires training, skill, and an ability to be unemotional about business. The world counts upon the people who “do the numbers” to provide clear, objective information > view more

+ Hospitality and Tourism Job Description
Recreation and celebration in America is big business! Just about everyone likes to play and party, and for every form of fun, there is work to be done! From baking special cakes, to managing betting at a casino, there are many ways to make a living in the field of hospitality and tourism. Many jobs in this field do not require more than a high school degree. Training is supplied on the job for such positions as janitors and cleaners, bakers and food preparation workers, bartenders and amusement and recreation attendants > view more

+ Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks Job Description
The desk clerk is usually the first person a guest encounters when checking into a hotel or motel. So, in addition to performing specific duties, the desk clerk has the responsibility of making a great first impression. It is important to be able to quickly and efficiently follow the steps needed to get a guest checked in. Being knowledgeable about checkout times, hotel services, and local attractions is essential > view more

+ Industrial Production Managers Job Description
Production, planning, and expediting clerks keep manufacturing plants operating smoothly. They ensure the continuous flow of work and material within production schedules. They deal with inventory of raw materials or subassemblies and production quotas. They track output and expedite orders when necessary. In small firms, one person may do the job; larger companies may need more. Working under the supervision of industrial managers, these clerks can boost production efficiency > view more

+ Loan Interviewers and Clerks Job Description
Whether applying for a credit card…or a home mortgage, you need to go through an approval process. And that’s where Loan Interviewers and Clerks come in. They play a vital role in helping lending institutions determine if you are a good …or bad credit risk. They do this by examining your credit history. The first step is often interviewing the loan applicant…either in person or on the phone. Speaking clearly, listening carefully and taking accurate notes are essential qualities > view more

+ Mail Clerks, Except Mail Machine Operators and Postal Service Job Description (more)
The mailroom is a place to start in a company, and gain experience to advance if you stand out as a reliable, efficient, energetic employee. It’s an entry-level job that provides an opportunity for people without much work experience. Mail clerks handle mail that moves in and around a company, as well as the mail being sent out. So some mail clerks load mail into carts that they take around the building > view more

+ Mail Processing Clerks Job Description
The U.S. Postal Service handles more mail than any other postal system in the world. Organizing this vital stream of letters and packages is the responsibility of Postal Service Sorters, Processors, and Machine Operators – also called Mail Processing Clerks. In small post offices, mail may be sorted by hand. In larger facilities, huge electronic letter sorting machines and computer scanning equipment are used > view more

+ Municipal Clerks Job Description
Whether in big cities or small towns, local municipal governments are at the heart of every community. The people who keep these government offices organized and functioning are Municipal Clerks. To do this job well, you need to be able to multi-task, because municipal clerks wear many hats. They do typical office work like contacting city officials, filing, typing, and data entry. They also maintain the official records for the municipality > view more

+ Office Clerks, General Job Description
If you’re task-oriented and detail-minded, becoming a general office clerk can be a great way to “get your foot in the door” at a company and place it firmly on the career advancement ladder. That’s because nearly every organization needs people who can type and file, operate photocopiers, fax machines, and other office equipment and perform many other jobs. Specific duties vary widely. Someone working in a doctor’s office won’t perform the same tasks as someone else working in an auto parts wholesaler or in a financial institution > view more

+ Order Fillers, Wholesale and Retail Sales Job Description
Every time you order merchandise from a catalog, or fax a request for information, your contact with a company is handled by an order clerk. Orders for materials, merchandise or services can come from within an organization or from outside. However, most order clerks receive orders from other companies or individuals. The order clerk serves an important role, since he or she is often a customer’s only direct contact with the company > view more

+ Purchasing Agents and Buyers, Farm Products
Imagine being paid to shop all day! Purchasers and buyers find the best possible goods at the lowest price for their firms. The successful ones increase company profits and their own salaries. In general, purchasers buy goods and services for company use; buyers acquire items for resale. Buyers and purchasing agents decide which vendor offers the best goods or services, negotiate the price, award the contract, and see that the correct amount is received on time > view more

+ Stock Clerks, Sales Floor Job Description
Companies, plants and stores use Stock Clerks to receive, sort, unpack, store and keep track of materials or products. Most stock clerks work in grocery and department stores. Stock clerks check deliveries against invoices for accuracy and for damages. The items are then organized, marked and placed into the inventory system. Bar code scanners and computers are often used to track the items > view more

+ Travel Clerks Job Description
Most travel clerks work for automobile clubs. Others are employed by large companies, hotels, and government agencies. Their primary task is figuring out the fastest, least expensive route from Point A to Point B. And then, once the client has approved, "making it all happen." That can mean making airline, hotel, rental car, and restaurant reservations—or arranging for visas and assembling customized road maps > view more